We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank is an unfortunately messy listen. No fair. In this day and age when it seems every band is calling their nine-song thirty-five minute EP a full-length, this comes as a great gift to the listener. We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank feels like the next step in the evolution of Modest Mouse’s style — in guitar, production and method — but some fans may find it a misstep.

Datum Review: 28.03.2007. Modest Mouse – We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank (Columbia) UK release date: 2 April 2007 We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank, then, is perhaps the smartest move Modest Mouse could have made. Neither is We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank. Reviewed in the United States on June 28, 2008 Making clanky dance pop seems to be a major fetish these days.

The Cd starts off a tad slow. We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank feels like the next step in the evolution of Modest Mouse’s style — in guitar, production and method — but some fans may find it a misstep. The album also builds off of the hard-edged rhythm changes and sound changes from their commercial hit Good News For People Who Love Bad News , while still reflecting on the slowing sounds and echoes of Modest Mouse's magnum opus, The Moon and … I will admit, the best songs are at the end and I at first thought it was meh when I heard the first few songs (dashboard being an exception). Taking a different path from the road-trip themed albums before it, We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank has a distinctive nautical feel. Still, too often it seems as if Modest Mouse plays it safe on We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank.

We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank is comprised of fourteen songs and a massive sixty-plus minutes. We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank continues that measured consistency, preserving the core Modest Mouse sound despite the recruitment of historic guitar … With each song, rain washes away waste and buried treasure emerges from the dirt. Erosion reveals the wheeze of a pump organ, hammer-ons like bird chirps, and those trademark slides, skid-marking the highway. Following up their 2004 commercially successful release of Good News for People Who Love Bad News, Modest Mouse has stuck largely to their uniquely odd style of music. March into the Sea opens the album and really sets the pace for things. We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank, then, is perhaps the smartest move Modest Mouse could have made. It is nothing like anything I've ever bought before, and I feel as though I am truly missing out on some of their other albums Even the addition of former Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr to the line-up seems incidental, as Modest Mouse's off … Most purchasers of We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank, which debuted at the top of the charts this week, are probably those grouches who will try their best to hate it. With Franz Ferdinand and Panic at The Disco revisiting this new wave station, Modest Mouse up the ante on "We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank." View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the 2007 180g Vinyl release of We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank on Discogs. Marr's presence is definitely noticable, yet the album is still mainly Brock driven - which is a good thing. The rhythm and singing sections bog the album down by failing to be unique and original, and end up being loud and annoying. There's plenty of choppy pop to go around for those that love it. There's plenty of choppy pop to go around for those that love it. We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank is full of upbeat tunes and catchy lyrics that make you just want to dance. Modest Mouse - We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank Allen Freunden des melancholisch angehauchten Indierocks muss die Wartezeit auf ein neues MODEST MOUSE Album wie die Hölle vorgekommen sein. We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank was he highly anticipated new release from Modest Mouse; now armed with the British national treasure, Johnny Marr (formerly guitarist and songwriter with the Smiths). 'We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank,' is even more perfect than Radiohead's 'Ok Computer.'