In the context of early social science, cultural relativism became an important tool for pushing back on the ethnocentrism that often tarnished research at that time, which was mostly conducted by white, wealthy, Western … Franz Boas, (born July 9, 1858, Minden, Westphalia, Prussia [Germany]—died December 22, 1942, New York, New York, U.S.), German-born American anthropologist of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the founder of the relativistic, culture-centred school of American anthropology that became dominant in the 20th century. Cultural Relativism 2.0 by Michael F. Brown Cultural relativism continues to be closely identified with anthropology even though few anthro-pologists today endorse the comprehensive version of it first articulated by students of Franz Boas. I begin with the relativist position, as it was defined by people like Franz Boas in the 1920s and ’30s.


In […] Franz Boas is credited with developing the concept of cultural relativism. Cultural relativism is the principle that an individual person's beliefs and activities should be understood by others in terms of that individual's own culture. Franz Boas, considered the “father of American anthropology” and the architect of its contemporary structure, helped revolutionize the consciousness and conscience of humanity by fighting against 19th-century colonial Anglo-American ethnocentrism and racism and championing 20th-century cultural relativism, tolerance, and multicultural awareness. Cultural relativism is the principle that the activities and what a person stands for must be understood by other cultures and people according to the culture of the person and not by the culture of others (Robbins and Derek 26). Boas is the father of modern anthropology and he introduced the notion of cultural relativism when, in his early years of work, he was disturbed by the racial bias and bigotry that were rampant among other anthropologists. The seminal work by an anthropologist on Boas’s cultural relativism and antiracism.
The concept of cultural relativism as we know and use it today was established as an analytic tool by German-American anthropologist Franz Boas in the early 20th century. Franz Boas was a scholar, professional, and activist who almost single-handedly transformed American anthropology from a field dominated by amateurs to a full-fledged professional, academic discipline.

The most fa- mous use of cultural relativism as a means of cultural critique is Margaret Mead 's dissertation research (un- der Boas) of adolescent female sexuality in Samoa. Franz Boas, (born July 9, 1858, Minden, Westphalia, Prussia [Germany]—died December 22, 1942, New York, New York, U.S.), German-born American anthropologist of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the founder of the relativistic, culture-centred school of American anthropology that became dominant in …